Who Killed Emil Kreisler?

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by Nigel Jarrett

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Postcards from a dead woman; a tale told in letters, centred on a strange musical instrument; the journey of Bismarck’s helmet … In Who Killed Emil Kreisler? Nigel Jarrett takes the reader through centuries and across continents to places well beyond their comfort zone.

978-0-9568921-1-9. Cultured Llama. PB. 203×127mm. 208pp. November 2016. Short Stories. £12.00.

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jarrettNigel Jarrett is a former newspaperman and a winner of the Rhys Davies Prize for short fiction. His first story collection, Funderland, was praised by The Guardian, The Independent and The Times. His début poetry collection, Miners at the Quarry Pool, was described as ‘a virtuoso performance’. Jarrett’s first novel, Slowly Burning, was published in 2016. His work is included in the Library of Wales anthology of 20th- and 21st-Century Welsh short fiction. Based in Monmouthshire, he writes for Jazz Journal, the Wales Arts Review and others.

Nigel Jarrett’s imagination takes readers to places well beyond their comfort zone.

Alan Ross, London Magazine

Jarrett’s stories take seemingly ordinary or innocent situations and gently tease out their emotional complexity.

Lesley McDowell, The Independent on Sunday

As a music critic by profession, Jarrett has a marvellous ear.

Alfred Hickling, The Guardian

Explaining what Jarrett does with language is a bit like trying to map gossamer with a chunky felt-tip.

Mary-Ann Constantine, writer and critic

Thought-provoking stories that take the reader on a journey and echo in the imagination long afterwards. His command of structure and voice and his exploration of identity make his work stand out.

David Caddy, editor of Tears in The Fence

 

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