Poetry by Rosie Jackson and John Brewster reviewed, and an interview with Emma Timpany

October 12th, 2016 § 0 comments

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The Light Box by Rosie Jackson is reviewed by Rachel Playforth in The Frogmore Papers, 88:

9780993211973-Perfect4-FRONT COVERI love the painful, angry, sad poems in the voice of Hilda Carline, the first wife of Stanley Spencer, which get at something very real and human beyond artworks and biography. The alluring not-quite-truths of art are also dramatically captured in ‘Can You Make My Mouth Smile More?’ which would be the standout poem here if there weren’t so many equally strong contenders.

The Light Box costs £10 plus p&p. Free postage and packing if you order two or more books from this website.

Automatic Writing by John Brewster is reviewed in Poetry Salzburg Review by CAITRÍONA O’REILLY, who particularly praises Brewster’s Scots poems:

John Brewster 9780992648589-Perfect(FINAL).indd“am aa din” (7) is a brilliant and very funny little lyric that succeeds by means of its jaunty rhythms and repetitions:

am aa din

am aa din in

am aa din daein

fir am aa din in

dinnae dae this

dae dae that

am aa din daein

fir am aa din in

Brewster shows a precise and knowing grasp of both language and of the apposite, emotion-drenched detail. When playing to his strengths, he shows himself to be a poet of promise in this volume.

Congratulations are due to John Brewster for his highly commended poem in the Wigtown Scots Prize, ‘Honi the Circle-Drawer’. The poem can be read here.

Automatic Writing costs £10 plus p&p. Free postage and packing if you order two or more books from this website.

Emma Timpany, author of The Lost of Syros, is interviewed by Rupert Dastur on the The Short Story website:

Front Cover The Lost of Syros 9780993211928 Hi-ResWhat makes for a successful short story?

The great thing about short stories is that although they are made from the same general elements – character, setting, internal and external conflict, and resolution (or lack of it) – there are countless ways of approaching writing them. You can categorise and analyse them but, in the end, like all art, there is something a bit odd and magical about how a story works, some inner tension that holds a few thousand words together, a little universe that you can’t add anything more to, or take anything away from, without it collapsing.

Read more here:The Short Story

The Lost of Syros costs £12 plus p&p. Free postage and packing if you order two or more books from this website.

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