Two Cook(e)s reviewed – poetry by Rose Cook and David Cooke

October 25th, 2017 § 0 comments

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Robert Garnham reviews Rose Cook as both a performer of poetry and a page poet with ‘the deftest of touches’. Of Rose Cook’s latest collection, Hearth, Garnham says:

The family is at the core of this collection. Many of the poems are meditations on her relationship with her mother, or the shock of a life-threatening injury to her own son. At such points there is real emotion, though never overblown or overwrought. Rose has the most deft of touches and can, with a very simple or honest phrase, provoke real emotion and universal sentiments […]

The world is a better place with Rose in it, from the turns which bring truth to the fore throughout her poems, to the humour she brings to the everyday. And if, like me, you’ve been lucky enough to hear her perform, her voice will stay with you throughout this wonderful collection.

Read the full review here.

Order a copy of Rose Cook’s latest poetry collection for £10 plus p&p: HearthAdd a copy of Rose Cook’s Notes From a Bright Field to your order, also £10, and postage and packing is free.

David Cooke’s After Hours is reviewed by Rachel Playforth in The Frogmore Papers:

This is a subtly elegiac collection, dedicated to the poet’s late father-in-law. The title sequence switches between the days and weeks following his death and scenes from his ‘stage Irish’ life, adding up to a lovingly realised portrait of a man and his allegiance/ to a place that doesn’t exist/ beyond exiled memories. Memory and history within Irish immigrant families and beyond are explored throughout the book, with decades melting away and generations united through a painting, a voice, an heirloom or a ritual. This culminates in ‘Biscuits’, an unlikely and masterful sestina conjuring up not only abstemious teatimes but a whole way of life.

Order a copy of David Cooke’s collection for £10 plus p&p: After Hours

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